Saturday, October 20, 2012

St John Cantius (EF, Oct 20)




"In Poland, St. John Cantius, priest and confessor. Being glorious for virtues and miracles, he was inscribed among the saints by the Sovereign Pontiff, Clement XIII."




Thursday, October 18, 2012

St Luke the Evangelist (EF/OF/Ben, Oct 18)



"The birthday of blessed Luke, Evangelist, who, after having suffered much for the name of Christ, died in Bithynia, filled with the Holy Ghost. His relics were taken to Constantinople, and thence conveyed to Padua."




Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Ordo for January 2013


This calendar has been prepared in accordance with the calendar and rubrics provided in the Breviarium Monasticum summorm pontificum cura recognitum pro omnibus sub regula S. P. Benedicti militantibus, issued by the Abbot Primate at Rome on 1 January 1963.

It should be noted, however, that individual monasteries may observe their own Ordos and use rubrics that differ somewhat from those specified in the Monastic Breviary.

Moreover, in addition to the feasts specified in the calendar, it will be necessary to add in any local feasts particular to the monastery, parish, diocese and country. In particular, this should include (where they have been appointed) the:

• principal patron of the country, region or province as a Class I;
• principal patron of the diocese or territory;
• anniversary of the dedication of the Cathedral of the diocese;
• patron of the town or city;
• anniversary of the dedication of the church;
• titular feast of the church;
• patron saint of the congregation or monastery;
• feast of the monasteries founder (if canonised or beatified); and
• saints specified in the calendar of the monastery's congregation.

It should be noted that while the Benedictine Calendar generally follows the structure of the 1962 Roman Extraordinary Form (EF) Calendar, the monastic calendar omits some feasts to be found in the Roman calendar and adds others.  In addition, feasts may be of different levels: many third class feasts in the 1962 Roman calendar for example, appear in the Benedictine as memorials only.  Cross-references to the Roman Extraordinary Form (EF) calendar have been included where the Mass of the day is likely to be different to that specified in the Benedictine calendar.

Page references labeled MD are to the Monastic Diurnal published by Farnborough Abbey in accordance with those rubrics.  Note that the Diurnal is not page numbered sequentially, but differentiates sections of the book by use of asterisks, square brackets and so forth.

Matins is not included in the Diurnal, but occasional notes (generally where the hour does not follow the normal pattern) have been included here for the benefit of those who use other books to say that hour.

This Ordo is intended as an aid to those who wish to say the Benedictine Office using the order of the psalms and prayers as specified in St Benedict’s Rule and developed as part of the patrimony of the Order of St Benedict. Every effort has been made to make this Ordo as accurate as possible, but if any errors are identified, please advise the author at australiaincognita@gmail.com or through a comment on the blog.


NATIVITYTIDE

Tuesday 1 January – Octave of the Nativity, Class I

Matins: Proper antiphons etc, psalms of Christmas

Lauds: Antiphons and proper texts for the feast, MD 108* ff, with festal (Sunday) psalms, MD 44

Prime: Antiphon 1 of Lauds, MD 108*

Terce to None: Antiphon, chapter, versicle and collect of the feast, MD 111* ff

Vespers:  As for I Vespers, MD 104*, with Magnificat antiphon, MD 113*

Compline: Marian Antiphon, Alma Redemptoris Mater

The Ordinary of the Office after the Octave of the Nativity (January 2-5)

At all hours, antiphons and psalms are of the day of the week as set out in the psalter for ‘throughout the year and in Nativitytide’.

At Matins, the Invitatory, hymn, versicles and chapter are of the season, and three readings are of the date.

At Lauds and Vespers, the chapter, responsory, hymn, versicle and canticle antiphon are for the season, and can be found at MD 119*-125*.

At Terce, Sext and None, the antiphon is as for throughout the year; the chapters and versicles are particular to Nativitytide (set out in the psalter section of the Diurnal, as well as at MD 122*-123*.

Wednesday 2 January – Class IV [EF: Most Sacred Name of Jesus; in some places, **St Thomas of Canterbury]

Matins: Readings for 2 January

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons for Wednesday throughout the year; chapter, responsory, hymn, Benedictus antiphon and collect for the Nativity, MD 120*-122*

Prime: All as for Wednesday ‘throughout the year and Nativitytide’

Terce to None:  All as for throughout the week in the psalter, with chapter, versicle and collect for Nativitytide, MD 122*-123*

Vespers: Antiphons and psalms for Wednesday with chapter, responsory, hymn and Magnificat antiphon for Nativitytide, MD 123*-125*

**for St Thomas, see MD 2**

Thursday 3 January – Class IV

Psalms of Thursday with ordinary of Nativitytide, MD 119*-125*; collect MD 122*

Friday 4 January Class IV; St Titus, memorial

Psalms of Friday with ordinary of Nativitytide, MD 119*-125*; collect MD 122*; for the commemoration at Lauds, MD 125-126*

Saturday 5 JanuarySaturday of Our Lady [EF: Commemoration of St Telesphorus]

Matins to None: Office of Our Lady after Christmas, MD (133) ff.  At Matins, reading 3 is Saturday 1 of January.

EPIPHANYTIDE

I Vespers of the Epiphany: MD 126* ff: Antiphons, chapter, responsory, hymn for the feast, MD 126*-129* with Sunday psalms, MD 203 ff

Sunday 6 January – Epiphany of Our Lord: Class I

Matins: Of the feast

Lauds: Antiphons and proper texts for the feast, MD 129*, with festal (Sunday) psalms, MD 44

Prime: Antiphon 1 of Lauds, MD 129*

Terce to None: Antiphon, chapter, versicle and collect of the feast, MD 132*-133*

Vespers: Antiphons for the feast, as at I Vespers, MD 126* ff, with Magnificat antiphon from MD 133*

The Ordinary of the Office in Epiphany (January 7-12)

Epiphanytide is part of the greater season of Christmastide, hence at all hours, antiphons and psalms are of the day of the week as in the psalter for ‘throughout the year and in Nativitytide’.

At Matins, the Invitatory antiphon, hymn, versicles, responsories and chapter are of the season.

At Lauds and Vespers, the chapter, responsory, hymn, and versicle are for the season, and can be found at MD 133*-139*.  There are proper antiphons for the canticles set for each day.

Monday 7 January – Class IV

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons of Monday; chapter, hymn etc, MD 133* ff; Benedictus, antiphon Day II, MD 135*; collect MD 136*

Prime to None: Antiphons etc of Epiphanytide

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Monday; chapter, hymn, etc, MD 137*; Magnificat, antiphon Day II, MD 139*

Tuesday 8 January – Class IV

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons of Tuesday; chapter, hymn etc, MD 133* ff; Benedictus, antiphon Day III, MD 135*; collect MD 136*

Prime to None: Antiphons etc of Epiphanytide

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Tuesday; Chapter, hymn, etc, MD 137*; Magnificat, antiphon Day III, MD 139*

Wednesday 9 January – Class IV

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons of Wednesday; Chapter, hymn etc, MD 133* ff; Benedictus, antiphon Day IV, MD 135*; collect MD 136*

Terce to None: Chapter and versicle of Epiphanytide

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Wednesday; chapter, hymn, etc, MD 137*; Magnificat, antiphon Day IV, MD 139*

Thursday 10 January - Class IV; St Paul the First Hermit, memorial

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons of Thursday Chapter, hymn etc, MD 133* ff; Benedictus antiphon Day V, MD 136*; collect MD 136*; after the collect make a memorial of St Paul, MD [23]

Terce to None: Chapter and versicle of Epiphanytide

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Thursday; chapter, hymn, etc, MD 137*; Magnificat, antiphon Day V, MD 139*

Friday 11 January – Class IV

Lauds: Psalms and antiphons of Friday Chapter, hymn etc, MD 133* ff; Benedictus, antiphon Day VI, MD 136*; collect MD 136*

Terce to None: Chapter and versicle of Epiphanytide

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Friday; chapter, hymn, etc, MD 137*; Magnificat, antiphon Day VI, MD 139*

Saturday 12 January – Saturday of Our Lady [**in some places: St Benedict Biscop, Class I]

Matins: As for Office of Our Lady throughout the year except for collect for after the Nativity; reading 3 for Saturday 2 of January

Lauds to None: Office of Our Lady after Christmas, see MD (133) ff
(Note the Benedictus antiphon, collect, and antiphons for Prime to None for the season)

For St Benedict Biscop, see MD 10**

Vespers: All as for I Vespers of the Epiphany except for the collect: MD 126*ff: Antiphons, chapter, responsory, hymn for the feast, MD 126*-129* with Sunday psalms, MD 203 ff; collect MD 140*

Sunday 13 January-– Commemoration of Our Lord’s Baptism, Class II

Matins: Readings for Nocturn I of the First Sunday of Epiphany, for Nocturns II and III of the feast

Lauds: Antiphons and proper texts for Epiphany, MD 129*, with festal (Sunday) psalms, MD 44; collect from MD 140*

Prime: Antiphon 1 of Lauds, MD 129*

Terce to None: Antiphons, chapters, versicle and collect of Epiphany, MD 132*-133* and collect from MD 140*

Vespers: Antiphons for Epiphany, as at I Vespers, MD 126* ff, with Magnificat antiphon from MD 133*; collect from MD 140*

TIME THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

Ordinary of Time throughout the year

From now until Septuagesima, the Offices uses the default texts set out in the psalter section of the Diurnal or Breviary for ‘time throughout the year’.

Monday 14 January – Class IV; St Hilary and St Felix, memorials

All as for Monday throughout the year; collect MD 142* (First Sunday after Epiphany); for the commemorations, MD [24]-[25]

Tuesday 15 January - Class IV [**In some places, Our Lady of Prompt Succour, Class I; EF: St Paul the First Hermit]

All as for Tuesday throughout the year; collect MD 142* (First Sunday after Epiphany).

For Our Lady of Prompt Succor, MD 11**-12**

Wednesday 16 January – Class IV; St Marcellus I, memorial

All as for Wednesday throughout the year; collect MD 142*; for the commemoration, MD [25]

Thursday 17 January - St Anthony, Class III

Matins: Reading 3 of the feast

Lauds and Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Thursday; the rest from the Common of a Confessor not a bishop, MD (78) and collect MD [26]

Terce to None: Chapter and versicle from the Common, collect from MD [26]

Friday 18 January - Class IV [EF: Commemoration of St Prisca]

All as for Friday throughout the year; collect MD 142*

Saturday 19 January – Saturday of Our Lady; SS Marius, Martha, Audifax and Abachum, memorial

Matins: Reading 3 of third Saturday of January

Lauds to None: Office of Our Lady on Saturday after Christmas, MD (133) ff; for the commemoration at Lauds, MD [26]

I Vespers of Second Sunday of Epiphany: Magnificat antiphon and collect, MD 146*

Sunday 20 January – Second Sunday after the Epiphany

All as in the psalter for Sundays throughout the year; at Lauds, Psalm schema 1 – 50, 117, 62; hymn Aeterne Rerum Conditor; collect and canticle antiphons from MD 146*-147*

Monday 21 January - St Agnes, Class III (Class II for monasteries of nuns) [**in some places, St Meinrad, Class I]

Matins: Invitatory and hymn from the Common of Virgins, lessons 1&2 of the day, lesson 3 and responsories of the feast

Lauds: Antiphons and proper texts for the feast, MD [27] ff with festal (Sunday) psalms, MD 44

Prime: Antiphon 1 of Lauds, with psalms of Monday

Terce to None: Antiphon, chapter, versicle and collect of the feast, MD [30] ff with hymns and psalms of Monday

Vespers: MD [31] ff

For St Meinrad, Class I, MD 16**ff

Tuesday 22 January – Class IV; St Vincent, memorial [**in some places, St Meinrad]

All as in the psalter for Tuesday; collect MD 147*; at Lauds, for the commemoration, MD [34]

For St Meinrad, Class II, MD 20**

Wednesday 23 January – Class IV; St Emerentiana, memorial

All as for Wednesday throughout the year, collect MD 147*; for the commemoration at Lauds, see MD [35]

Thursday 24 January – Class IV; St Timothy, memorial

All as for Thursday throughout the year, with the collect, MD 147*; at Lauds, for the commemoration MD [35] – [36]

Friday 25 January – Conversion of St Paul, Class III

Matins: Invitatory, hymn, readings and collect of the feast; rest as in the psalter

Lauds: Antiphons and proper texts for the feast, MD [36]ff with festal (Sunday psalms, MD 44), with collects of St Paul and St Peter under one conclusion

Prime: Antiphon 1 of Lauds, with psalms of Friday

Terce to None: Antiphon, chapter, versicle and collect of the feast, MD [39] ff with hymns and psalms [for 'throughout the week'].  Collect of St Paul, MD [39]

Vespers: Antiphons for the feast, MD [40] with psalms for the Common of Apostles, MD (13).  Chapter, responsory etc for the feast, with collects of St Paul and St Peter under one conclusion

Saturday 26 January – Saturday of Our Lady; St Polycarp, memorial

Office of Our Lady on Saturday, MD (133) ff; at Lauds, for the commemoration MD [42]– [43].

SEASON OF SEPTUAGESIMA

The "pre-Lent" season of Septuagesima

 At I Vespers of Septuagesima Sunday, the Alleluia is solemnly ‘buried’ with a double Alleluia added to the closing versicle.  At Compline and henceforward, the Alleluia is not said, and the Alleluia in the opening prayer for each hour is replaced by ‘Laus tibi Domine…’

At Vespers, the Magnificat antiphon is proper to the day.

I Vespers of Septuagesima Sunday: Psalms and antiphons as in the psalter for Saturday, but with chapter, responsory, hymn etc from MD 153*-154*.  Note the double alleluia.

Sunday 27 January – Septuagesima Sunday, Class II

Lauds: Antiphons from MD 154* ff, with psalms of Sunday (Ps 50, 117, 62); chapter etc for the day from MD 153* ff

Prime to None: Antiphons etc for the day from MD 158*-159*

Vespers: Psalms and antiphons of Sunday from the psalter; chapter, responsory, hymn etc for the day, from MD 159*                        

Monday 28 January – Class IV; St Cyril of Alexandria, memorial

All as for Monday in Septuagesima with collect MD 157*-158*; for the commemoration at Lauds, MD [44], and Magnificat antiphon at Vespers, MD 161*

Tuesday 29 January – Class IV; St Frances de Sales, memorial

All as in the psalter for Tuesday in Septuagesima, collect MD 157*-158*; for the commemoration, MD [44]– [45], and Magnificat antiphon at Vespers, MD 161*

**As Class I, see MD 21**

Wednesday 30 January – Class IV

All as in the psalter for Wednesday in Septuagesima, collect MD 157*-158*; Magnificat antiphon MD 161*

Thursday 31 January – Class IV; St John Bosco, memorial

All as in the psalter for Thursday in Septuagesima, collect MD 157*-8*; for the commemoration at Lauds, MD [45]– [46]; for the Magnificat antiphon at Vespers, MD 162*

Monday, October 15, 2012

St Teresa of Avila (EF/OF/Ben, Oct 15)



Today's saint is one of that expanding band of female doctors of the Church, St Teresa of Avila.

From the martyrology:

"At Avila, in Spain, St. Theresa, virgin, mother and mistress of the Carmelite Brothers and Sisters of the Strict Observance."

Pope Benedict XVI gave a General Audience on her in 2011:

"St Teresa, whose name was Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada, was born in Avila, Spain, in 1515. In her autobiography she mentions some details of her childhood: she was born into a large family, her “father and mother, who were devout and feared God”, into a large family. She had three sisters and nine brothers.

While she was still a child and not yet nine years old she had the opportunity to read the lives of several Martyrs which inspired in her such a longing for martyrdom that she briefly ran away from home in order to die a Martyr’s death and to go to Heaven (cf. Vida, [Life], 1, 4); “I want to see God”, the little girl told her parents.

A few years later Teresa was to speak of her childhood reading and to state that she had discovered in it the way of truth which she sums up in two fundamental principles.

On the one hand was the fact that “all things of this world will pass away” while on the other God alone is “for ever, ever, ever”, a topic that recurs in her best known poem: “Let nothing disturb you, Let nothing frighten you, All things are passing away: God never changes. Patience obtains all things. Whoever has God lacks nothing; God alone suffices”. She was about 12 years old when her mother died and she implored the Virgin Most Holy to be her mother (cf. Vida, I, 7).

If in her adolescence the reading of profane books had led to the distractions of a worldly life, her experience as a pupil of the Augustinian nuns of Santa María de las Gracias de Avila and her reading of spiritual books, especially the classics of Franciscan spirituality, introduced her to recollection and prayer.

When she was 20 she entered the Carmelite Monastery of the Incarnation, also in Avila. In her religious life she took the name “Teresa of Jesus”. Three years later she fell seriously ill, so ill that she remained in a coma for four days, looking as if she were dead (cf. Vida, 5, 9).

In the fight against her own illnesses too the Saint saw the combat against weaknesses and the resistance to God’s call: “I wished to live”, she wrote, “but I saw clearly that I was not living, but rather wrestling with the shadow of death; there was no one to give me life, and I was not able to take it. He who could have given it to me had good reasons for not coming to my aid, seeing that he had brought me back to himself so many times, and I as often had left him” (Vida, 7, 8).

In 1543 she lost the closeness of her relatives; her father died and all her siblings, one after another, emigrated to America. In Lent 1554, when she was 39 years old, Teresa reached the climax of her struggle against her own weaknesses. The fortuitous discovery of the statue of “a Christ most grievously wounded”, left a deep mark on her life (cf. Vida, 9).

The Saint, who in that period felt deeply in tune with the St Augustine of the Confessions, thus describes the decisive day of her mystical experience: “and... a feeling of the presence of God would come over me unexpectedly, so that I could in no wise doubt either that he was within me, or that I was wholly absorbed in him” (Vida, 10, 1).

Parallel to her inner development, the Saint began in practice to realize her ideal of the reform of the Carmelite Order: in 1562 she founded the first reformed Carmel in Avila, with the support of the city’s Bishop, Don Alvaro de Mendoza, and shortly afterwards also received the approval of John Baptist Rossi, the Order’s Superior General.

In the years that followed, she continued her foundations of new Carmelite convents, 17 in all. Her meeting with St John of the Cross was fundamental. With him, in 1568, she set up the first convent of Discalced Carmelites in Duruelo, not far from Avila.

In 1580 she obtained from Rome the authorization for her reformed Carmels as a separate, autonomous Province. This was the starting point for the Discalced Carmelite Order.

Indeed, Teresa’s earthly life ended while she was in the middle of her founding activities. She died on the night of 15 October 1582 in Alba de Tormes, after setting up the Carmelite Convent in Burgos, while on her way back to Avila. Her last humble words were: “After all I die as a child of the Church”, and “O my Lord and my Spouse, the hour that I have longed for has come. It is time to meet one another”.

Teresa spent her entire life for the whole Church although she spent it in Spain. She was beatified by Pope Paul V in 1614 and canonized by Gregory XV in 1622. The Servant of God Paul VI proclaimed her a “Doctor of the Church” in 1970.

Teresa of Jesus had no academic education but always set great store by the teachings of theologians, men of letters and spiritual teachers. As a writer, she always adhered to what she had lived personally through or had seen in the experience of others (cf. Prologue to The Way of Perfection), in other words basing herself on her own first-hand knowledge.

Teresa had the opportunity to build up relations of spiritual friendship with many Saints and with St John of the Cross in particular. At the same time she nourished herself by reading the Fathers of the Church, St Jerome, St Gregory the Great and St Augustine.

Among her most important works we should mention first of all her autobiography, El libro de la vida (the book of life), which she called Libro de las misericordias del Señor [book of the Lord’s mercies].

Written in the Carmelite Convent at Avila in 1565, she describes the biographical and spiritual journey, as she herself says, to submit her soul to the discernment of the “Master of things spiritual”, St John of Avila. Her purpose was to highlight the presence and action of the merciful God in her life. For this reason the work often cites her dialogue in prayer with the Lord. It makes fascinating reading because not only does the Saint recount that she is reliving the profound experience of her relationship with God but also demonstrates it.

In 1566, Teresa wrote El Camino de Perfección [The Way of Perfection]. She called it Advertencias y consejos que da Teresa de Jesús a sus hermanas [recommendations and advice that Teresa of Jesus offers to her sisters]. It was composed for the 12 novices of the Carmel of St Joseph in Avila. Teresa proposes to them an intense programme of contemplative life at the service of the Church, at the root of which are the evangelical virtues and prayer.

Among the most precious passages is her commentary on the Our Father, as a model for prayer. St Teresa’s most famous mystical work is El Castillo interior [The Interior Castle]. She wrote it in 1577 when she was in her prime. It is a reinterpretation of her own spiritual journey and, at the same time, a codification of the possible development of Christian life towards its fullness, holiness, under the action of the Holy Spirit.

Teresa refers to the structure of a castle with seven rooms as an image of human interiority. She simultaneously introduces the symbol of the silk worm reborn as a butterfly, in order to express the passage from the natural to the supernatural.

The Saint draws inspiration from Sacred Scripture, particularly the Song of Songs, for the final symbol of the “Bride and Bridegroom” which enables her to describe, in the seventh room, the four crowning aspects of Christian life: the Trinitarian, the Christological, the anthropological and the ecclesial.

St Teresa devoted the Libro de la fundaciones [book of the foundations], which she wrote between 1573 and 1582, to her activity as Foundress of the reformed Carmels. In this book she speaks of the life of the nascent religious group. This account, like her autobiography, was written above all in order to give prominence to God’s action in the work of founding new monasteries.

It is far from easy to sum up in a few words Teresa’s profound and articulate spirituality. I would like to mention a few essential points. In the first place St Teresa proposes the evangelical virtues as the basis of all Christian and human life and in particular, detachment from possessions, that is, evangelical poverty, and this concerns all of us; love for one another as an essential element of community and social life; humility as love for the truth; determination as a fruit of Christian daring; theological hope, which she describes as the thirst for living water. Then we should not forget the human virtues: affability, truthfulness, modesty, courtesy, cheerfulness, culture.

Secondly, St Teresa proposes a profound harmony with the great biblical figures and eager listening to the word of God. She feels above all closely in tune with the Bride in the Song of Songs and with the Apostle Paul, as well as with Christ in the Passion and with Jesus in the Eucharist. The Saint then stresses how essential prayer is. Praying, she says, “means being on terms of friendship with God frequently conversing in secret with him who, we know, loves us” (Vida 8, 5). St Teresa’s idea coincides with Thomas Aquinas’ definition of theological charity as “amicitia quaedam hominis ad Deum”, a type of human friendship with God, who offered humanity his friendship first; it is from God that the initiative comes (cf. Summa Theologiae II-II, 23, 1).

Prayer is life and develops gradually, in pace with the growth of Christian life: it begins with vocal prayer, passes through interiorization by means of meditation and recollection, until it attains the union of love with Christ and with the Holy Trinity. Obviously, in the development of prayer climbing to the highest steps does not mean abandoning the previous type of prayer. Rather, it is a gradual deepening of the relationship with God that envelops the whole of life.

Rather than a pedagogy Teresa’s is a true “mystagogy” of prayer: she teaches those who read her works how to pray by praying with them. Indeed, she often interrupts her account or exposition with a prayerful outburst.

Another subject dear to the Saint is the centrality of Christ’s humanity. For Teresa, in fact, Christian life is the personal relationship with Jesus that culminates in union with him through grace, love and imitation. Hence the importance she attaches to meditation on the Passion and on the Eucharist as the presence of Christ in the Church for the life of every believer, and as the heart of the Liturgy. St Teresa lives out unconditional love for the Church: she shows a lively “sensus Ecclesiae”, in the face of the episodes of division and conflict in the Church of her time.

She reformed the Carmelite Order with the intention of serving and defending the “Holy Roman Catholic Church”, and was willing to give her life for the Church (cf. Vida, 33,5).

A final essential aspect of Teresian doctrine which I would like to emphasize is perfection, as the aspiration of the whole of Christian life and as its ultimate goal. The Saint has a very clear idea of the “fullness” of Christ, relived by the Christian. At the end of the route through The Interior Castle, in the last “room”, Teresa describes this fullness, achieved in the indwelling of the Trinity, in union with Christ through the mystery of his humanity.

Dear brothers and sisters, St Teresa of Jesus is a true teacher of Christian life for the faithful of every time. In our society, which all too often lacks spiritual values, St Teresa teaches us to be unflagging witnesses of God, of his presence and of his action. She teaches us truly to feel this thirst for God that exists in the depths of our hearts, this desire to see God, to seek God, to be in conversation with him and to be his friends.

This is the friendship we all need that we must seek anew, day after day. May the example of this Saint, profoundly contemplative and effectively active, spur us too every day to dedicate the right time to prayer, to this openness to God, to this journey, in order to seek God, to see him, to discover his friendship and so to find true life; indeed many of us should truly say: “I am not alive, I am not truly alive because I do not live the essence of my life”.

Therefore time devoted to prayer is not time wasted, it is time in which the path of life unfolds, the path unfolds to learning from God an ardent love for him, for his Church, and practical charity for our brothers and sisters."

Saturday, October 13, 2012

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost/28th in Ordinary Time




At Matins the first and second Nocturn readings this week are for the Second Sunday of October.  The Scriptural text is I Maccabees 4:36-51, and the commentary on it is from St Augustine's City of God.

The Gospel is St John 4:46-53.

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Friday, October 5, 2012

SS Placid and Maurus OSB (Ben), Oct 5



From the martyrology:

"At Messina, in Sicily, the birthday of the holy martyrs Placidus, monk, disciple of the blessed abbot Benedict, and of his brothers Eutychius and Victorinus, and Flavia, virgin, their sister; also of Donatus, Firmatus, deacon, Faustus, and thirty other monks, who were murdered for the faith of Christ by the pirate Manuchas."




Thursday, October 4, 2012

St Francis of Assisi (EF/OF/Ben), Oct 4


Jusepe de Ribera
From the martyrology:

"At Assisi, in Umbria, the birthday of St. Francis, confessor, founder of the Order of Friars Minor, whose life, filled with holy deeds and miracles, was written by St. Bonaventure."




Monday, October 1, 2012

St Remigius (EF); St Terese of the Child Jesus (OF), Oct 1



St Remigius (437-533) baptised King Clovis, resulting in the conversion of the Franks to Christ.  From the martyrology:

"At Rheims, in France, St. Remigius, bishop confessor, who converted the Franks to Christ, regenerated Clovis, their king, in the sacred font of Baptism and instructed him in the mysteries of faith. After he had been many years bishop, and had distinguished himself by his sanctity and the power of working miracles, he departed this life on the 13th of January. His festival, however, is kept on this day, when his sacred body was translated."

St Terese's feast is celebrated on October 3 in the Extraordinary Form and traditional Benedictine calendar, and notes on her will appear here on that day.